First off, thank you so much for this insightful blog post, it's exactly what I needed. But, my software vendor's affiliate program has a funnel of their own, requiring the prospect to sign up with their email address. Is it appropriate for me to collect the prospects email in the Opt-in page, and then expect the prospect to submit their email a second time in order to signup for the product free seven day trial? If appropriate, do you have any advice for how that should be structured?

I do agree that my wording was a bit 'aggressive' in the video... With that said, I am still driving traffic from FB directly to landing pages that have ~15 words max on them, to this day! My ad copy and my landing page copy are super similar... And I get a high relevance score... I've had no problems at all. One thing I recommend is setting up a business.facebook.com account, then setting up as many ad accounts as you can (not adding any credit card to them, tho) to just have some extra accounts there... Just in case.
Amazon Associates — Amazon sells millions of products (books, music, electronics, toys, and more) that fit into virtually any niche, so its affiliate marketing program is a natural choice for almost anyone. Comparatively speaking, its payouts are generous, too: They vary based on product type and sales volume, but commission rates start at 4 percent and can reach up to 15 percent for specific product lines. However, note that Amazon’s program is now illegal in several states (although there are some work-arounds).
AWIN is probably best for experienced affiliates who can hit the ground running without a lot of guidance or feedback from the network. There is a $5 fee charged to apply to become an affiliate, but if you’re approved, the $5 will be added to your account. If your application is denied, however, you will lose the $5 fee. AWIN operates globally, but it is most heavily concentrated on British and EU merchants.

LinkConnector is something of a mixed bag, so it’s probably best for experienced affiliates who have become disillusioned with other networks and are looking to expand. LinkConnector’s bizarre mix of high-quality products and a low-quality dashboard make it hard to truly assess its viability, but their exclusive deals with some vendors can make it a true home run for publishers working in certain niches.
Always disclose your affiliate relationship. Most visitors will probably understand that graphic ad will lead to your getting paid, but if you write a review or use an in-text link as a recommendation, you want your readers to know that may lead to compensation as well. This ensures you retain transparency and trust with your readers, but also, it's required by the FTC's endorsement rules.

Do you know that even a small commitment can make a huge difference to your bottom line. If you ask too much right away (a name and an email), sometimes, it can put people off and they will leave. The smallest commitment could be as simple and easy for your visitor as clicking on a button (Learn more for example). With our technology, when someone clicks on this button, it will then display the optin form. And since they already commited to a click, most of the time, they will fill the optin form!
Earning income via Target affiliates, however, requires a bit of work. Cookies expire in just seven days, and commissions can be as low as just one percent, so you’ll need to be operating a high-traffic website in order to make serious cash with this program. But with Target’s much-beloved brand reputation and vast catalog, relevant product links can be a big earner for established influencers.
Do you have any information on how to set up and link Landing Page, Thank you page, etc. in Thrive (For an Affiliate funnel) like you do with Clickfunnels? I have read and watched several times (above) but am not able to convert Clickfunnel understanding to Thrive. I have watched several tutorials in Thrive University and haven't yet seen how to do that. Any assistance is greatly appreciated; Thank you!

The concept of affiliate marketing on the Internet was conceived of, put into practice and patented by William J. Tobin, the founder of PC Flowers & Gifts. Launched on the Prodigy Network in 1989, PC Flowers & Gifts remained on the service until 1996. By 1993, PC Flowers & Gifts generated sales in excess of $6 million per year on the Prodigy service. In 1998, PC Flowers and Gifts developed the business model of paying a commission on sales to the Prodigy Network.[8][9]
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